Roman History

Roman History

Introduction | Directions | Map

Go back in time and imagine the harbour as it would have been in Roman times. This day out includes a visit to a Roman Palace, a cycle ride and a pleasant stroll along the shoreline looking for Roman artefacts.

If you are travelling by car, there is parking at the Roman Palace and near the pub at Dell Quay.

Directions

1. If you can arrive by bike, then get off to a Roman start by travelling down the Centurion Way which crosses the course of a Roman road. Look out for the Roman amphitheatre sculpture and Roman archway. At the southern end of the Centurion Way pick up the South Coast Cycle Route which will take you to the Roman Palace. www.westsussex.gov.uk/leisureandtourism/prow/pdfs/CenturionWayLeaflet2002.pdf

Roman Day

2. Visit the Roman Palace at Fishbourne. The Palace was originally a military base at the time of Roman invasion in AD43 and was developed into a sumptuous Palace by the end of the first century. At the Palace you can see the famous Cupid on a Dolphin mosaic and other fine mosaics. The gardens have been replanted to the original plan using plants known to have been cultivated by the Romans. www.sussexpast.co.uk

3. Cycle down the Salterns Way to Dell Quay an important place in Roman times.

Roman Day

Roman Day

4. Stop for refreshment at the waterside pub The Crown and Anchor or bring a picnic and sit on the old Quay.

5. Look out on the channel and imagine the scene as Roman galleys passed on their way to Fishbourne. It is thought that one of the earliest Roman landings was in Chichester Harbour, as the local Atrebates tribe were friendly to the Roman empire. It is possible that Stane Street, the Roman road leading from Chichester to London may have continued to Dell Quay.

Roman Day

Roman Day

6. Walk south from Dell Quay along the shoreline. A tilery was in the fields nearby during Roman times making tiles out of the local clay. It is likely that this tilery produced the tiles for the Roman Palace. Look carefully in the clay banks and on the shore for pieces of Roman tiles. These are like thick chunks of pale terracotta. It is easy to confuse the Roman pieces with pieces of Victorian water pipe which are similar but tend to be darker.

Map


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